Welcome to our plot!

I'm Hazel, and in Nov 2006 my friend Jane and I took on a half plot at Hill Allotments, Sutton Coldfield - we want the satisfaction of growing and eating our own fruit and veg, and to improve our diet (and fitness!).

This is the story of what happened next...........

Wednesday, August 19, 2009

Triffid Alert!

I cycled to the Hill tonight with the aim of sorting out the squash plants in bed d1.

The tiny plants that looked so lost a couple of months ago when planted out are making a serious bid for world domination. The plan was to cut back all the runners to a viable squash - it is too late in the season for new setting squash to ripen, I think - thus making the bed somewhat less unruly.

The plan worked - to a degree. I was quite ruthless in chopping & composting any number of buckets of wild growth and immature fruits (this despite Jason (behind retired Maureen) passing by with cries of 'squash murderer' & shrieking 'don't let me die ....ahhhhhhhhhhhh!!!!'), although when I stood back to admire my evening's work, I don't appear to have touched the surface...

Undeterred, I picked a portion of RUNNER BEANS (reg-next-plot) & a COURGETTE (yellow golden), & cut some sweetpeas. Jason redeemed himself with passing by with a handful of delicious raspberries - which is something else to aim on the plot for next year...

4 comments:

  1. Good thinking - I must take a good look at my Turk's Turban squashes. I know some have set but they are taking over pathways now!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Sorry that this is probably not the best place for these but I couldn't find a contact address.

    I'm sure you must be aware of the problems experienced by allotment holders last year due to the use of manure contaminated by a persitent herbicide called aminopyralid. Information has been collated about this problem from the links on this page http://www.glallotments.btik.com/p_Contaminated_Manure.ikml
    Just to update on the latest re aminopyralid contamination in case you would like to provide updates on your website or to allotment holders in your area.

    The latest infomation re manure contamination is posted on my website here http://www.glallotments.btik.com/p_herbicide_latest.ikml
    I have also sent out a email for circulation by everyone I know that has been affected which is here http://www.glallotments.btik.com/attachments/contaminated_manure_alert.pdf which you may find useful to circulate to allotment holders in your area.

    It is particularly important that gardeners be aware of the need for caution when obtaining manure in light of the fact that the government are now considering reinstating the licence that was temporarily suspended last year. As this is a concern to many gardeners you may wish to publicise an a epetition that has been started here http://petitions.number10.gov.uk/aminopyralidban/

    I am posting updates as I get them on my blog http://glallotments.blogspot.com/ just on case you want to keep a watching brief.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I found one of the 'olive' squashes in amongst the foliage yesterday, Flum - so called as the fruits resemble (you've guessed it) an olive.

    This is true in all aspects apart from size - the olive squash is about 3 million times bigger than an olive...

    I am aware of aminopyralid damage, GL, and very much hope that it is not re-licensed!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Oh goodness, laughing, have just surfaced from under a quilt on the sofa and find that inadvertently, on the phone yesterday, I quoted your blog back to you - and I hadn't read it (great minds think alike and all that).

    As we said, you obviously did not read the magic word, written in invisible ink, on the back of the seed packet which says "Familias Triffidus" . Cheer up - just think how much goodness you've added to the compost heap.

    ReplyDelete

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...